best-hammer-drills-corded

7 Best Corded Hammer Drills (2021 Review)

For most drilling jobs there’s a battery powered hand drill. But when you need that extra bit of mains powered grunt, in steps the corded hammer drill. It’s ideal for drilling into hard materials like concrete and steel, or when you need to drill wide holes in timber. I’ve checked out the best corded hammer drills available right now, so you don’t have to. Come and see what I found out…

What is the Best Hammer Drill For You?

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Comparing the Best Hammer Drills

Use the dropdown to sort the table by the feature that's most important to you.

  • Best For
  • Power
  • Speed Settings
  • No Load Speed
  • Impact Rate
  • Keyless Chuck
  • Max drilling into Wood
  • Max drilling into Concrete
  • Max drilling into Steel
  • Weight
  • Cost
  • Our score
  •  
  • Bosch AdvancedImpact 900W Hammer DrillBosch AdvancedImpact 900W Hammer Drill
    Bosch AdvancedImpact 900W Hammer Drill
    • Best 2 speed hammer drill
    • Power900W
    • Speed Settings2
    • No Load Speed50-1,120, 2,850rpm
    • Impact Rate0-48,450bpm
    • Keyless ChuckYes
    • Max drilling into Wood40mm
    • Max drilling into Concrete18mm
    • Max drilling into Steel13mm
    • Weight2.6kg
    • 4.5
    • CHECK PRICE →
  • DeWalt DEWD024KS 701W Hammer Drill DeWalt DEWD024KS 701W Hammer Drill
    DeWalt DEWD024KS 701W Hammer Drill
    • Best compact hammer drill
    • Power710W
    • Speed Settings1
    • No Load Speed0-2,800rpm
    • Impact Rate0-47,600bpm
    • Keyless ChuckNo
    • Max drilling into Wood25mm
    • Max drilling into Concrete16mm
    • Max drilling into Steel13mm
    • Weight1.8kg
    • 4.75
    • CHECK PRICE →
  • Bosch Professional GSB 1600 Hammer DrillBosch Professional GSB 1600 Hammer Drill
    Bosch Professional GSB 1600 Hammer Drill
    • Best hammer drill for site use
    • Power701W
    • Speed Settings1
    • No Load Speed0-3,000rpm
    • Impact Rate0-48,000bpm
    • Keyless ChuckYes
    • Max drilling into Wood30mm
    • Max drilling into Concrete16mm
    • Max drilling into Steel12mm
    • Weight1.9kg
    • 4.75
    • CHECK PRICE →
  • Makita HP1640 Percussion DrillMakita HP1640 Percussion Drill
    Makita HP1640 Percussion Drill
    • Best for quality and price
    • Power500W
    • Speed Settings1
    • No Load Speed0-2,800rpm
    • Impact Rate0-44,800bpm
    • Keyless ChuckNo
    • Max drilling into Wood30mm
    • Max drilling into Concrete13mm
    • Max drilling into Steel13mm
    • Weight2.0kg
    • 4.75
    • CHECK PRICE →
  • Meterk 850W Hammer DrillMeterk 850W Hammer Drill
    Meterk 850W Hammer Drill
    • Best budget hammer drill
    • Power850W
    • Speed Settings1
    • No Load Speed0-3,000rpm
    • Impact Rate0-48,000bpm
    • Keyless ChuckNo
    • Max drilling into Wood25mm
    • Max drilling into Concrete13mm
    • Max drilling into Steel13mm
    • Weight2.02kg
    • 4
    • CHECK PRICE →
  • Einhell 1010W Impact Drill Einhell 1010W Impact Drill
    Einhell 1010W Impact Drill
    • Best hammer drill for power
    • Power1,010W
    • Speed Settings1
    • No Load Speed0-3,000rpm
    • Impact Rate0-48,000bpm
    • Keyless ChuckNo
    • Max drilling into Wood32mm
    • Max drilling into Concrete16mm
    • Max drilling into Steel13mm
    • Weight2.12kg
    • 4.25
    • CHECK PRICE →
  • Galax Pro Hammer DrillGalax Pro Hammer Drill
    Galax Pro Hammer Drill
    • Best hammer drill for beginners
    • Power600W
    • Speed Settings1
    • No Load Speed0-3,000rpm
    • Impact Rate0-48,000bpm
    • Keyless ChuckNo
    • Max drilling into Wood25mm
    • Max drilling into Concrete13mm
    • Max drilling into Steelunknown
    • Weight1.9kg
    • 4
    • CHECK PRICE →

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In-Depth Reviews of Our Recommended Hammer Drills

Bosch AdvancedImpact 900W Hammer DrillBosch AdvancedImpact 900W Hammer Drill

Best 2 speed hammer drill

Build Quality
Preformance
Ease of use
Value for Money
Overall
4.5
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Bosch AdvancedImpact 900W Hammer Drill review

Specifications

  • Power: 900W
  • Speed Settings: 2
  • No Load Speed: 50-1,120, 2,850rpm
  • Impact Rate: 0-48,450bpm
  • Keyless Chuck: Yes
  • Max drilling into Wood: 40mm
  • Max drilling into Concrete: 18mm
  • Max drilling into Steel: 13mm
  • Weight: 2.6kg

In my opinion, the Bosch AdvancedImpact 900 is the best corded hammer drill. It’s powerful, easy to handle and has an excellent adjustable front grip. I love Bosch’s green range of quality DIY tools. Their hammer drill is ideal if you need to drill holes in hard materials like brick or stone.

The first thing that you’ll notice about this hammer drill is the control you have over speed versus torque. You can switch the main gearing between 1 for low speed and high torque and 2 for higher speed and less torque. You can then fine tune even more with the speed control on the trigger.

Weighing just over 2.5 kg, it’s heavy if you want to use it for extended periods of time. The keyless chuck can take drill bits up to 13 mm, more than enough for most home DIY tasks. The powerful motor spins the drill bit up to a maximum 2,850 rpm with a maximum bpm of 48,450.

The depth stop is easy to set and move out of the way when it’s not in use, you don’t have to dig around in your toolbox for it. What makes this the best hammer drill that I’ve tried out is the focus on safety. The electronic speed control can detect if the drill bit jams. It then cuts out the motor, saving you from a wrenched wrist.

Pros

  • You get a whopping 900 Watts of motor power to play with. Seeing as this is a drill designed for heavy work, you need all the grunt you can get.
  • The AdvancedImpact 900 has a higher no-load speed compared with the Makita HP1640. It’s really making the most of the large motor size.
  • If you want to drill wide holes in timber, this is the best hammer drill for the job. The maximum cutting capacity of 40 mm is impressive!
  • In comparison with the Bosch Professional GSB1600RE, this is a more capable concrete driller. 18 mm maximum drilling capacity vs 16 mm is surprising.

Cons

  • If you’re in the market for a lightweight hammer drill, this isn’t the one. Compared to the DeWalt DEWD024K’s 1.8 kg, this feels overweight.
  • Some users have had problems with the keyless chuck. In some cases, it’s lost vital grip on drill bits.
  • Even though the depth stop is easily stowed away on the drill itself, it’s made from plastic. For a heavy duty bit of kit, a metal depth stop would have been preferred.
  • Power cable length on any corded power tool is important. 2.5 m is a bit stingy and means I need to get the extension cord out for a lot of jobs.

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DeWalt DEWD024KS 701W Hammer Drill DeWalt DEWD024KS 701W Hammer Drill

Best compact hammer drill

Build Quality
Preformance
Ease of use
Value for Money
Overall
4.75
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DeWalt DEWD024KS 701W Hammer Drill review

Specifications

  • Power: 710W
  • Speed Settings: 1
  • No Load Speed: 0-2,800rpm
  • Impact Rate: 0-47,600bpm
  • Keyless Chuck: No
  • Max drilling into Wood: 25mm
  • Max drilling into Concrete: 16mm
  • Max drilling into Steel: 13mm
  • Weight: 1.8kg

US tool brand DeWalt is one of the most trusted names on building sites around the world. Their line of power tools is respected by savvy DIYers as well. The DEWD024K percussion drill is a compact and powerful beast. It’s ready to punch through masonry and blockwork without breaking a sweat.

You can easily switch between regular drilling and hammer mode with the flick of a finger. The variable speed trigger is responsive and easy to get the hang of as well. The soft start is a welcome feature. Even though the drill produces plenty of torque, it doesn’t feel like it’s going to jump out of your hands.

Weighing just 1.8 kg, it’s the lightest hammer drill on my list. That doesn’t mean it’s a lightweight though. With a maximum rpm of 2,800 and 47,600 bpm impact rate, it’ll make short work of most drilling jobs.

The short overall length at 81 cm will help you get into tighter spaces than the competition. It’s the best compact corded hammer drill that I’ve come across. The icing on the cake is the excellent DeWalt carry case. It’s rough, tough and will keep your drill looking good for years.

Pros

  • Lightweight, compact, and easy to handle. You’ll be surprised how powerful this drill is, putting out an impressive 394 on the power to weight scale.
  • The DeWalt carry case is probably worth the money on its own. If you value your tools, then a strong carry case is essential.
  • There’s a lot of metal on this drill. Compared with the Bosch AdvancedImpact 900, it’s got a metal front handle and metal depth stop. It’s built to work hard.
  • I’m a big fan of the large, rubberised grip. You can put your hand and arm in line with the drill bit for maximum precision.

Cons

  • The metal depth stop is a bare piece of metal. I’d like to have seen some sort of measurements engraved on it to save getting out the tape measure.
  • A maximum drilling capacity of just 25 mm into wood is a bit small. In comparison with the Bosch AdvancedImpact 900, it’s 15 mm less to play with.
  • There’s only one torque setting. You need to have a steady trigger finger for precision drilling jobs.
  • The lock off switch only works on maximum rpm. It would be better if you could set a speed a lock onto it.

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Bosch Professional GSB 1600 Hammer DrillBosch Professional GSB 1600 Hammer Drill

Best hammer drill for site use

Build Quality
Preformance
Ease of use
Value for Money
Overall
4.75
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Bosch Professional GSB 1600 Hammer Drill review

Specifications

  • Power: 701W
  • Speed Settings: 1
  • No Load Speed: 0-3,000rpm
  • Impact Rate: 0-48,000bpm
  • Keyless Chuck: Yes
  • Max drilling into Wood: 30mm
  • Max drilling into Concrete: 16mm
  • Max drilling into Steel: 12mm
  • Weight: 1.9kg

Another entry from Bosch. This time it’s from their blue Professional range of power tools for tradespeople and in-the-know DIYers. The GSB 1600 is one of the best impact drills you can get in this size class.

Weighing in at just 1.9 kg, you might think you’ve got yourself an underpowered toy. However, this is a totally capable impact drill with a variable speed trigger. It just happens to be easy to work with for long periods. Your arms will thank you for buying such a light and manoeuvrable tool.

The 701 Watt motor spins the sharp end up to a maximum 3,000 rpm. It also puts out an impressive impact rate of 48,000 bpm.

The full metal chuck is well knurled for extra grip and can take all standard sized bits up to 13 mm. The grip is reasonably comfortable and the top of it has a lip. It’ll hold your hand steady when drilling deep holes. The only let down is the plastic front handle and depth gauge. They’ll probably last long enough but if you’re going to use the drill a lot, metal would be preferable.

Pros

  • Built for the hard knocks and scrapes on a building site, this is a seriously rugged drill. I can see it lasting for years of good service.
  • The keyless chuck works better compared to the Bosch AdvancedImpact 900. You know where the extra money has gone.
  • The 4 metre power cable is long enough for most jobs. It makes all the difference with corded power tools.
  • You can easily fit the GSB 1600 into a drill press stand. It makes it a highly versatile bit of kit to have on hand.

Cons

  • The keyless chuck still isn’t that good. For a Bosch “blue” tool, you’d expect one that compares to the brilliant chuck on the DeWalt DEWD024K.
  • I still think there’s too much plastic on this drill. The drill case itself is tough, but I don’t know about the plastic depth stop or front handle.
  • Compared with the Bosch AdvancedImpact 900, there is only one torque setting. You can fiddle with the speed but having “fast” and “slow” modes is handy.

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Makita HP1640 Percussion DrillMakita HP1640 Percussion Drill

Best for quality and price

Build Quality
Preformance
Ease of use
Value for Money
Overall
4.75
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Makita HP1640 Percussion Drill review

Specifications

  • Power: 500W
  • Speed Settings: 1
  • No Load Speed: 0-2,800rpm
  • Impact Rate: 0-44,800bpm
  • Keyless Chuck: No
  • Max drilling into Wood: 30mm
  • Max drilling into Concrete: 13mm
  • Max drilling into Steel: 13mm
  • Weight: 2.0kg

Japanese tool brand Makita make some of the best hammer drills around. I’m a huge fan of the HP1640 percussion drill. It’s simple, uncomplicated, and powerful enough for most DIY jobs. If you’re looking for a top brand drill without the huge price tag, try this one out.

The pistol grip is nicely shaped for the hand. There’s plenty of soft rubberised plastic help keep down any vibrations as well. The long in-line finger grip is useful. It’ll help to keep everything steady on deep drilling jobs.

The 500 Watt motor isn’t the strongest on my list, but it keeps up with the competition. It spins up to a maximum 2,800 rpm. Providing an adequate impact rate of 44,800 bpm it’s got enough to do the business. You can drill holes in wood up to 30 mm, 16 mm in masonry and steel. Unfortunately, the max drilling capacity for concrete is just 25 mm.

Although this isn’t the most powerful hammer drill that Makita have ever made, it’s a reliable workhorse. The build quality is excellent, and the metal chuck feels solid. For the price it’s one of the best corded hammer drills available right now.

Pros

  • Makita build quality without the price tag. It’s an affordable drill if you still want a big name.
  • It only weighs 2 kg. While this isn’t the lightest drill compared to the DeWalt DEWD024K, it’s still amazingly easy to handle.
  • A keyed chuck isn’t to everyone’s taste, but I think they do a great job. You can tighten up the chuck effectively and stash the key in the rubber holder.
  • Users have commented on the quality of the chuck as well. There’s minimal slip, even when drilling into concrete.

Cons

  • Compared to the Bosch AdvancedImpact 900, this drill is underpowered. 500 Watts is fine for general DIY jobs though.
  • With a power to weight ratio of 250, it’s neither light nor powerful!
  • Unfortunately, this drill doesn’t come supplied with one of Makita’s excellent hard cases.
  • The best hammer drills I’ve tried out, like the Bosch Professional GSB1600RE run faster. The maximum rpm or 2,800 isn’t bad but it’s not class leading either.

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Meterk 850W Hammer DrillMeterk 850W Hammer Drill

Best budget hammer drill

Build Quality
Preformance
Ease of use
Value for Money
Overall
4
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Meterk 850W Hammer Drill review

Specifications

  • Power: 850W
  • Speed Settings: 1
  • No Load Speed: 0-3,000rpm
  • Impact Rate: 0-48,000bpm
  • Keyless Chuck: No
  • Max drilling into Wood: 25mm
  • Max drilling into Concrete: 13mm
  • Max drilling into Steel: 13mm
  • Weight: 2.02kg

Specialising in quality DIY power tools at affordable prices, Meterk have produced a surprisingly heavy-duty impact hammer drill. It offers boat loads of power without emptying your wallet.

Putting out 850 Watts of power, this is a seriously powerful hammer drill. It can spin up to 3000 rpm, more than enough to drill into wood, metal, masonry, and blockwork. The grip isn’t as comfortable as one the Bosch AdvancedImpact 900, but it’s fine for DIY use.

You can drill up holes up to 25 mm in wood, and 13 mm in steel or concrete. It makes use of the big motor to produce an impressive impact rate of 48,000 bpm. Not bad for a budget end power tool.

One thing I really like about the Meterk hammer drill is the keyed chuck. You can tighten it down by hand, but when you need a little extra the key gives you more torque. It should keep the bit from binding or slipping in the chuck.

Pros

  • It’s a serious looking drill with lots of rubber overmoulded parts. You wouldn’t think it was such an affordable bit of kit.
  • Not everyone liked a keyed chuck. They’re becoming rarer these days but offer a mechanical advantage when it comes to tightening drill bits properly.
  • The depth gauge and handle work in the same way as the excellent DeWalt DEWD024K. In comparison, the Meterk uses plastic parts but it’s still convenient.
  • Weighing in at just over 2 kg, this drill has an excellent power to weight ratio of 421. What a monster!

Cons

  • For a drill with a big and powerful motor, the max drilling capacity is small. For 850 Watts, you’d expect a comparison with the Bosch AdvancedImpact 900’s 40 mm max capacity.
  • Some users have complained about the quality of the included chuck key. For a vital piece of the tool, it seems to be made of soft metal. It won’t last.
  • For the price you can’t expect lots of metal parts on the drill body. The front grip and depth gauge are plastic too. It’s not designed to be used for seriously heavy work.

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Einhell 1010W Impact Drill Einhell 1010W Impact Drill

Best hammer drill for power

Build Quality
Preformance
Ease of use
Value for Money
Overall
4.25
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Einhell 1010W Impact Drill review

Specifications

  • Power: 1,010W
  • Speed Settings: 1
  • No Load Speed: 0-3,000rpm
  • Impact Rate: 0-48,000bpm
  • Keyless Chuck: No
  • Max drilling into Wood: 32mm
  • Max drilling into Concrete: 16mm
  • Max drilling into Steel: 13mm
  • Weight: 2.12kg

Germany’s Einhell are one of those dependable DIY brands. They keep producing honest tools that get the job done. I tested out the TC-ID 1000 E impact drill. It’s a powerful yet lightweight drill to use on wood, metal and blockwork.

The handle is quite comfortable but lacks the refinements of the best corded hammer drills around. You can lock out the variable speed trigger and switch between hammer and normal drilling easily though. The keyed chuck is all metal and easy to tighten down when you need it.

The huge 1,010 Watt motor powers the drill end up to 3,000 rpm. You get an impact rate of 48,000 bpm at max speed as well. Weighing 2,12 kg, it’s not a lightweight tool, but with a motor that size you can understand.  With a max drilling capacity of 32 mm in wood, 16 mm in concrete and 13 mm in metal, it’ll get the job done right.

I was happy to see a metal depth stop on this impact drill. It’s certainly sturdier than some of the plastic ones I’ve tried out. It’s more likely to last being dropped or knocked around on the job. If you need a heavy duty corded hammer drill on a budget, this is a solid choice.

Pros

  • The 1,010 Watt motor is more than enough for any DIY job you can throw at it. Compared to the Makita HP1640, there’s twice as much power.
  • I love a metal depth stop. You can’t truly call your hammer drill a heavy duty bit of kit if it has a flimsy plastic stop.
  • The shape of this drill makes it ideal for mounting to a drill press stand. You can turn it into a bench top pillar drill without much fuss.
  • An unbeatable power to weight ratio of 476. Not bad for a budget corded hammer drill.

Cons

  • For a heavy duty drill with over 1,000 Watts to play with, a drilling capacity of just 25 mm in wood is limiting.
  • It’s a heavy drill. 2.12 kg might not sound a lot, but it makes a difference when you use it all day.
  • Not everyone gets on well with a keyed chuck. They do take longer to swap drill bits and you get another little bit of kit you need to take care of.

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Galax Pro Hammer DrillGalax Pro Hammer Drill

Best hammer drill for beginners

Build Quality
Preformance
Ease of use
Value for Money
Overall
4
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Galax Pro Hammer Drill review

Specifications

  • Power: 600W
  • Speed Settings: 1
  • No Load Speed: 0-3,000rpm
  • Impact Rate: 0-48,000bpm
  • Keyless Chuck: No
  • Max drilling into Wood: 25mm
  • Max drilling into Concrete: 13mm
  • Max drilling into Steel: unknown
  • Weight: 1.9kg

You might be surprised at the large range of tools produced by Galax Pro. There’s everything from laser range finders to one of the best budget corded hammer drills you can get for the money.

Just because this drill costs much less compared to the professional brands; it doesn’t mean it’s a toy. It might only have 600 Watts under the hood, but it keeps up with some of the more expensive drills on this list.

The grip is surprisingly comfortable. You get a large front handle and integrated depth stop as well. There’s also a chunky forward/reverse switch and you can lock off the drill at max speed.

You get an impressive 3,000 rpm on the sharp end, and an impact rate of 48,000 bpm. Compared to the DeWalt DEWD024K, that’s actually a few more per minute for concrete drilling jobs. The drill can handle a maximum cutting capacity of 25 mm in wood and 13 mm in concrete. They’re not the most impressive numbers, but for the price you can’t complain too much.

If you really don’t want to spend a lot and you still want decent performance, you can’t go wrong with this hammer drill. Don’t expect it to last a lifetime though.

Pros

  • A handy and lightweight hammer drill for most home DIY jobs. At 1.9 kg it’s incredibly light compared to the Einhell TC-ID 1010W.
  • An ideal hammer drill for beginners. It’s powerful enough to get the job done, but it’s not so big to scare off new DIYers.
  • I didn’t expect to see a metal depth stop or front handle at this price. You have to pay for real sturdiness!

Cons

  • I’d rather the forward/reverse button was further away from the trigger. Those switches get knocked easily.
  • This drill isn’t designed for drilling through steel. Galax don’t offer a maximum capacity for steel.
  • Some users have commented that the drill produces a lot of sparks during use. This is a common occurrence in brushed motors but could be a sign of poor brushes.

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Things to Know Before Buying a Corded Hammer Drill

Even though a lot of tools are moving towards battery power, you can’t beat a corded hammer drill when you need to make holes in masonry or blockwork.

Comfort is Everything

Drilling long holes in hard materials can be hot, dusty and dirty work. If you’re planning on using a drill for long periods time, make sure it’s easy to grip, lightweight and doesn’t vibrate too much. The best corded hammer drills use ergonomic rubberised grips and sturdy secondary handles to reduce fatigue and vibration through the tool and into your arms.

What Wattage to Choose

A Watt is a measure of power- the higher the Wattage, the more power you have to play with. You don’t need 1000 Watts to drill through plasterboard or softwood, but when you’re tackling concrete or masonry, the extra power makes the job easier.

Variable Speeds

One of the features found on all the best corded impact drills is a variable speed trigger. Simply put, the harder you pull the trigger, the faster the drill spins. Having the ability to change speed will make a big difference in your drilling- some materials respond better to different speeds, and it makes the tool a lot more controllable.

Auxiliary Handle

The auxiliary handle, or front grip, is the best way to get full control of your hammer drill. Working from a stable base when you’re drilling into hard materials is important to reduce the chance of injury if the drill bit binds up.

Depth Stop

When you need to drill to an accurate depth, having a depth stop saves you time and guesswork. Particularly useful for putting in multiple rawl plugs or wall anchors, you set the depth stop and drill until the end touches the wall. Ideal for avoiding over-drilling, they come in useful as a quick ruler as well.

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Corded Hammer Drill FAQs

What is a hammer drill?

Otherwise known as a percussive drill or impact drill. Regular twist drills rotate when you pull the trigger, but when you need to punch through harder materials, a hammer setting is essential. When you pull the trigger on a hammer drill, a weight is forced towards the drill tip in a hammering action at the same time as it rotates.

When will I need the hammer drill setting?

Drilling through soft materials can be achieved with just rotational action, but harder materials like brick, blockwork, stone and concrete need a hammer action unless you enjoy drilling the same hole for ten minutes. When the hammer setting is engaged, the drill bit is literally hammering into the material as it twists.

How can I find the hammer setting on my drill?

You might already have a hammer action on your current drill- look for a switch with a picture of a hammer on it- it’s usually just behind the chuck. If you can’t find it, take a look at the user manual supplied with your drill.

Do I need any special PPE when I use a hammer drill?

You should always use adequate ear and eye protection when using any power tool, but users need to take extreme care when drilling into hard materials that produce dust and shrapnel.

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