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6 Best Hedgehogs Houses for Mrs Tiggy Winkle! (2021 Review)

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In this guide we’ll look at the best hedgehog houses for your garden.
I’ve compared build quality, hedgehog protection, material, and cost
to give you my top recommendations.

What is the Best Hedgehog House?

In a rush? Here's my top choice...

Wildlife World Hogilow Hedgehog Home

Cleverly-designed home to keep hedgehogs comfy and safe!

This Hogilow Hedgehog Home has an innovative design which will keep hedgehogs safe and also create a haven to keep an eye on poorly ones. It's made of FSC timber and recycled plastics, with an anti-predator tunnel hedgehogs can stay out the way of intruders. Easy to open and clean, it measures 50 x 39 x 23 cm.

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Everything I Recommend

IMAGE RECOMMENDED PRODUCTSPRODUCT FEATURES
  • Made from solid timber
  • Anti-predator tunnel
  • Featured on Autumnwatch
  • Solid Wood
  • Hinged roof with lock
  • Anti-predator tunnel
  • Brushwood & moss finish
  • Waterproof roof
  • Makes a good feeding station
  • Natural brushwood finish
  • Water-resistant felt roof
  • Well camouflaged
  • Waterproof
  • Easy to maintain & install
  • Good value
  • Solid FSC wood
  • Slanted slate roof
  • Decent size

More Detailed Hedgehog House Reviews

Wildlife World Hogilow Hedgehog Home

FEATURES RATING PRICE
FEATURES
  • Made from solid timber
  • Anti-predator tunnel
  • Featured on Autumnwatch
OUR RATING
98
PRICE
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Wildlife World Hogilow Hedgehog Home Review

The Hogilow Hedgehog Home is a well-designed refuge for hedgehogs, created by ‘Wildlife World’, a company based in the Cotswolds.

It has clearly been well received by wildlife enthusiasts, as it has been featured on Autumnwatch and is also popular with the Hedgehog Preservation Society for their hedgehog rehabilitation/release projects.

These accolades help to reassure that it’s a quality product, and whilst it may not be the cheapest, there are several justifications for its slightly higher price. The materials have been thoughtfully obtained, and the house is made from FSC approved sustainably-sourced timber as well as recycled plastic.

It’s therefore one of the best hedgehog houses for the environmentally conscious, and it’s clear that a lot of thought has gone into making the shelter in a conscientious way.

In terms of its design, the 50 x 39 x 23 cm home has a curved anti-predator tunnel at the entrance, meaning hedgehogs are kept safe from larger animals (especially if they choose to hibernate inside).

There is, however, a possibility that smaller cats might be able to weave their way into the shelter, so this might be something to bear in mind if you or your neighbours have petite feline pets. The instruction state how best to position the house to stop animals from getting in.

When it comes to upkeep, cleaning and inspecting the interior can be done easily by swivelling the lid to one side. As a result, it’s possible to keep the home hygienic and suitable for many years’ use.

Some people opt to rest the hut on a solid base, such as bricks or a concrete slab, to stop damp from damaging the wooden base and raised wooden feet. The sides are wooden too, but they are protected from the elements by a green plastic coating.

This covering also disguises the shelter in the garden, allowing it to blend in with the surrounding foliage.

Pros

  • Well built with a durable construction that withstands most weather conditions
  • Green exterior coating blends in to stop hedgehog house from sticking out in the garden
  • Sliding lid makes it easy to clean the interior space
  • All construction materials are sustainably resourced or recycled

Cons

  • Small cats may be able to get past the anti-predator tunnel
  • The wood used to raise this house off the ground may be susceptible to rot, so creating a foundation of bricks or paving slabs may help

Riverside Woodcraft Hedgehog House

FEATURES RATING PRICE
FEATURES
  • Solid Wood
  • Hinged roof with lock
  • Anti-predator tunnel
OUR RATING
95
PRICE
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Riverside Woodcraft Hedgehog House Review

Hedgehogs can be messy, so shelters that are easy to clean like the Riverside Woodcraft Hedgehog House can save time. This is especially true if you are putting food inside the hut.

The weatherproof composite-wood roof is hinged, making it easy to access the living quarters. Inside, the house is divided into two: a rectangular entry corridor and a square sleeping area, both of which can be completely accessed from the top.

There is an anti-fungal and anti-bacterial coating on all of the solid wood exterior, and the flooring is resin bonded which is good for several reasons. It’s easy to clean, helps control moisture, and doesn’t rot easily.

Measuring 52.5 x 38.5 x 51 cm, there’s plenty of space for hedgehogs inside, and the entrance measures 12 x 12 cm.

Much like the Wildlife World ‘Hogilow’ house featured here, the entry corridor is designed to deter predators, with the hedgehogs entering into the annexed room to hibernate. There may still be enough space for some small cats to get in though.

On the plus side, it’s possible to lock down the roof of this Riverside house, to stop larger animals from pushing it open, which is not a feature on the Hogilow.

Overall, this is a well-made, sturdy hedgehog house which offers good protection from the elements. Due to its hinged lid and square shape, it’s also one of the best hedgehog houses for easy cleaning, helped by the resin bonded flooring and treated wood.

Pros

  • Solidly built with thick wood creating a strong shelter
  • Easy to clean as the hinged lid provides access to all compartments
  • Good weather resistance with a roof overhang of 3.5 cm surrounding the house

Cons

  • Some small cats may be able to access the main compartment because of the straight entry corridor
  • Roof and 'porch' colour don't match - made of different materials

Wildlife World Igloo Hedgehog House

FEATURES RATING PRICE
FEATURES
  • Brushwood & moss finish
  • Waterproof roof
  • Makes a good feeding station
OUR RATING
81
PRICE
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Wildlife World Igloo Hedgehog House Review

If you’re after a basic shelter for the hedgehogs in your garden, this Wildlife World Igloo Hedgehog House offers decent accommodation for hedgies whilst being one of the best hedgehog houses in terms of value for money.

It has a much simpler design compared to the ‘Hogilow’ featured on this page, despite being made by the same company, but that’s not to say that it doesn’t still offer hedgehogs a dry place to retreat.

The ‘wicker’ effect is created using a brushwood and moss trim, which naturally blends in with garden undergrowth. Underneath the moss layer there is a waterproof covering over a metal frame, so the shelter can protect hedgehogs from rain.

There’s no floor included, so it’s less of a fully-encompassing shelter than some others, and despite the fact it’s quite large at 59 x 53 x 22 cm, there is a chance that larger animals could flip it over.

For this reason, it seems like it would be best positioned amongst bushes or in a similarly protected location. Although ground pegs aren’t included, using them would make the shelter more secure.

Alternatively, instead of being used as a home or sleeping spot, you could use this shelter as a covered feeding station, stopping cats and foxes from eating food that you put out for hedgehogs.

Pros

  • Decorative and natural design blends in with most gardens
  • Has a lot of internal space so can accommodate a whole family of hedgehogs
  • The small entrance tunnel should deter predators and larger animals
  • Works well as a feeding station as there's no floor

Cons

  • Anchor pegs will need to be bought separately to secure down the shelter
  • No base included so there's the potential that it could be flipped over if not sufficiently secured

Wildlife World Hedgehog Care Pack

FEATURES RATING PRICE
FEATURES
  • Natural brushwood finish
  • Water-resistant felt roof
  • Well camouflaged
OUR RATING
79
PRICE
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Wildlife World Hedgehog Care Pack Review

This Wildlife World Hedgehog Care Pack is a great option for budding hedgehog lovers. It would make a great gift for children as well, coming with a full kit of parts to get them inspired to care for hedgehogs.

Included in the care pack is a domed shelter, an informative guide on caring for hedgehogs, and a 100 g serving of Spikes Meaty Feast Hedgehog Food.

The shelter is relatively large, measuring 57 x 41.5 x 16 cm, and has a basic rectangular shape. Its outer layer is finished with brushwood, so it blends well into the natural surroundings of the garden, and there’s also a waterproof layer underneath to keep the house dry inside.

Whilst there’s no floor to this shelter, it can be pegged to the ground (although the anchors need to be bought separately). If it isn’t secured, there will be a risk of predators flipping it over as it’s relatively light.

In terms of the included guide, it will be more interesting and informative to children than adults, but offers some good information on hedgehog care and protection.

Overall, this is a good value pack which includes everything required to start up a hedgehog hotel in the garden, and gifting it to a young wildlife lover could help pique their interest in hedgehog conservation.

Pros

  • Included guide has a lot of information on hedgehogs that may be particularly interesting to younger family members
  • The narrow entranceway deters cats and other predators
  • Natural finish blends in well with garden shrubbery
  • Some proceeds from the sale of the leaflet go towards the British Hedgehog Preservation Society

Cons

  • Needs to be anchored down to create a safe environment and pegs are not included
  • Some twigs from the natural covering can break off in transit

Wildlife World Habitat Hedgehog Home

FEATURES RATING PRICE
FEATURES
  • Waterproof
  • Easy to maintain & install
  • Good value
OUR RATING
77
PRICE
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Wildlife World Habitat Hedgehog Home Review

If you want to keep your hedgehog shelter camouflaged in the garden, this Wildlife World Habitat Hedgehog Home is easy to conceal and can be hidden from predators and humans alike.

Its rust-proof steel frame is covered with a waterproof liner, and on top of that are layers of natural insulation including moss and brushwood. When covered further, with a layer of leaves or cuttings from the garden, it becomes almost completely concealed.

Several hedgehogs can fit inside, and it can be used as a covered feeding station or sleeping quarters depending on where you place it. There’s no base, but this can be beneficial if used primarily as a food spot, as it’s easier to regularly empty out food and water bowls.

However, it does therefore need to be situated on relatively dry ground, and especially in a place that doesn’t suffer from a lot of water run off after rain.

The entrance tunnel helps to keep out cats and other intruders, but anchors will need to be used to stop predators from tipping the shelter over. Pegs for doing this are not included, but should be purchased separately to make the house more secure.

Also, due to the size of the entrance hole, some small cats may still be able to steal food from inside the shelter, although bricks can be used to create more of an obstacle at the entrance.

Overall, this is a reasonably priced shelter and one of the best hedgehog houses if you’re looking for something that easy to conceal, given how well it can blend in with the garden.

Pros

  • This house is large enough for a family of hedgehogs to move into
  • Waterproof cover keeps the underneath of the shelter dry
  • Can be covered with leaves and cuttings to make it almost completely camouflaged
  • Easy to clean out and replace food as there’s no floor

Cons

  • Some small cats may be able to squeeze in the entrance
  • Needs to be anchored down to stop predators from being able to flip it over

Tom Chambers Hedgehog House

FEATURES RATING PRICE
FEATURES
  • Solid FSC wood
  • Slanted slate roof
  • Decent size
OUR RATING
74
PRICE
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Tom Chambers Hedgehog House Review

This Tom Chambers Hedgehog House is made from FSC certified hardwood, with no plywood in sight. The only element which is not made from hardwood is the pitched slate roof, which allows water to run off whilst keeping the interior protected.

It’s one of the smaller shelters featured on this list, measuring 48.5 x 35 x 26 cm, making it a good choice for more compact gardens, although it will also suit bigger spaces. Despite its smaller size, it’s still large enough to fit at least a couple of hedgehogs inside, and can be used as either a feeding station or a hibernation spot.

The one drawback of using it as a feeding station is that birds can easily access the food, along with cats and other wildlife, as the entry hole is relatively large. Placement is crucial with this particular shelter to avoid too many other species using it too.

There’s no base, but it weighs 5 kg which makes it a lot heavier than the majority of hedgehog houses featured on this list. It should therefore be relatively difficult for predators to tip over, but there’s no way of securing it down further.

All in all, it’s a well-made shelter, and one of the best hedgehog houses in terms of appearance; the slate roof and varnished hardwood combine to create a very smart-looking residence. However, there are drawbacks, like the size of the entryway, which may mean it’s not suitable for cat owners.

Pros

  • Hardwood construction feels very solid
  • The slate roof is fully waterproof with a large overhang that prevents the wood from getting too wet
  • As there’s no floor, this house can simply be lifted for cleaning and moved to another location if needed

Cons

  • There are no feet to keep the wood off of the damp ground
  • Users can't see if there is a hedgehog inside without lifting up the whole house due to the fixed roof

Things to Know Before Buying a Hedgehog House

Hedgehog numbers are declining at a shocking rate in the UK. Unbelievably, we’ve lost a third of them since the millennium. The good news is your garden can provide a lifeline for these sweet little animals.

You can start helping hedgehogs right away by establishing a safe and welcoming environment in the garden in the following ways:

  • Create a hole in your fence line/dig a tunnel beneath it.
  • Put out a shallow heavy bowl of water and some cat biscuits to tempt them in.
  • Throw away slug pellets.
  • Pick up your netting.
  • Create an escape route from steep sided ponds.

Once you’ve prepared these steps, it’s time to get a hedgehog house. When hedgehogs realise your garden is safe, well-stocked and has a steady water supply, they’ll want to move in!

The following information will help you work out the best hedgehog house to buy, and how to prepare for your new garden guests:

Wooden Hedgehog Houses

If you want a wooden hedgehog house, go for real hardwood.

Plywood just won’t go the distance, and the last thing you want is rotting wood surrounding a nest or hibernating hog – rot makes hedgehogs vulnerable to predators and fungal infections.

If you buy a stained or varnished hog house, it will last longer; however, it may take a season for hogs to move in. They have sensitive noses and strong smells can deter them initially. Once the house has been weathered, hedgehogs will be more likely to use it.

Metal-Framed Hedgehog Houses

Metal framed hog houses can cause condensation, so wooden houses are usually recommended by wildlife charities, but there’s no escaping the fact that metal-framed houses are usually better value. If you do go for one, try to make sure it gets enough ventilation to dry out.

Additionally, it’s important to check metal-framed houses inside and out before use, in case there are any sharp edges.

Hedgehogs can get caught or cut by protruding pieces of metal, so t’s really important to keep the houses in good condition and check them regularly.

It’s also a good idea to peg down a metal-frame house as they don’t tend to weight much and can be easily flipped over. An excitable dog, child, cat or fox could all be in danger of tipping over a hedgehog house.

Tent pegs can be used to secure a hedgehog house – push them through the frame and brushwood into the earth beneath.

Houses with Tunnels

If you are able to stretch to a slightly pricier version that has a tunnel and two internal sections, the hedgehogs will be safer from predators.

You want to avoid predators being able to stick their paw in to drag out bedding or even the hedgehog itself. Some of the best hedgehog houses feature a predator-proof tunnel; this is often a narrow tunnel with at least one 90° bend in it. These will stop predators from reaching their paws into the main room of the shelter.

Baby hedgehogs (known as hoglets – awh!) are especially vulnerable, so you should at least make a tunnel yourself if you choose a house without one – a few bricks will make all the difference.

Hedgehog houses can be used as either nests or protected feeding stations.

However, the houses shouldn’t be used as both. If you put food inside the home of your resident hedgehog, you risk attracting other hedgehogs (creating potential turf wars), predators and flies into their chambers. It will basically make nest invasions inevitable.

You can either buy two hedgehog houses, and use one for each purpose, or create your own feeding station by placing a patio slab on bricks. Placing food outside in the open overnight will likely attract neighbourhood cats and foxes, but hedgehogs will get a look in on the food as well.

If you want to double check who or what is actually eating the food you put out, installing a wildlife camera can be reassuring; that way you can check that the hedgehogs are benefitting.

Once you’ve got a hedgehog home, you’ll be wondering how to attract those hedgehogs. Here are a few things you can do to get them coming to your garden:

  • You will need hedgehog-sized garden access so that hogs can find your house. They can’t climb over fences, so a 15 x 15 cm hole in the fence will help them get in. Failing that, dig beneath your fence to create a tunnel (this might need to be discussed with your neighbour first…!). If there’s no access, there will be zero hedgehogs.
  • Ensure a clean, reliable water source is easily accessible. Wildlife will visit your garden if you leave out water. The trick is to make it clean and consistent. Hogs travel several kilometres a night and they get very thirsty. In hot weather many hedgehogs are taken to wildlife rescues with severe dehydration – imagine not having a drink for days in a heat wave. If you spot a hedgehog sunbathing take it straight to a vet or wildlife charity.
  • After water comes food. Never give hedgehogs bread and milk no matter what your friends say. Hedgehogs are lactose intolerant and giving them products with lactose will cause diarrhoea. This can cause hedgehogs to die of dehydration. Bread won’t kill them, but it has no useful nutrients. The best food is dry or wet cat food in a meaty flavour. Dog food is good too.

There are some tricks to siting a hedgehog house – they prefer certain areas over others.

Choose a sheltered spot on dry soil that doesn’t get waterlogged. Think about the winter months – does it get wet there? If so, find another location – damp will cause health problems for hibernating hedgehogs.

Also think about heat. A hedgehog house in direct boiling sun can kill a hedgehog inside. If you have any large bushes (evergreens are particularly good) that’s a good place to position a hedgehog house. Hedgehogs like a bit of cover when they emerge, plus it helps maintain a consistent temperature within the shelter.

You should also turn the door so it faces away from prevailing winds. Hedgehogs won’t appreciate any 50 mph gusts blowing inside the shelter and creating a chill.

The final step is to make sure it’s not placed on a hedgehog footpath. Hedgehogs often frequent certain paths as they enter and leave your garden. Often they run along the fence line if that’s where they access your garden from. If this is the case, don’t put the hedgehog house there. It’s too busy to be attractive to potential residents. Hogs like secret sheltered places.

Tip: Don’t be tempted to bury the hedgehog house as this creates damp. Cover it with leaves if you want, and then keep watch from a distance.

Any time is a good time to put a hedgehog house out – right now is excellent, in fact!

Hedgehogs are active for most months of the year, even during hibernation they are often looking for water and food in warmer snaps. During these times it’s possible that the hedgehog will happen across your much more suitable accommodation and choose to move in.

Hedgehogs use houses in a number of ways:

1. Hibernation – Hedgehogs hibernate for several months because food is in short supply. Don’t worry – feeding them cat food won’t interrupt their natural hibernation – it’s the cold that triggers the instinct. Hibernating hogs will feel cold to the touch, breathe shallowly and appear dead. Don’t move any hog out of a house in winter because you assume it’s died – it’ll just be deeply asleep.

2. A day nest – don’t worry if your hog disappears for a few days, they have large territories and can’t always make it back in time, so they have several nests in the area. Dirty stop outs indeed! Something as simple as a dog walker crossing their path at 5 am can prevent them returning before sunrise.

3. Nests – Females can have several litters a year and hedgehog houses can make the perfect nursery. They usually give birth in June or July, and may have a second litter around September/October. Therefore, keeping a hedgehog house out keeps it as a viable option for any expecting mothers.

 

If you don’t want to have your hedgehog house out all year long, you can put it out in autumn to help potentially hibernating hedgehogs. They can start hibernating as early as November, and may stay hibernating until late March. This is all dependent on the weather as well as the hedgehog.

Hedgehogs are good at finding dry, warm bedding materials, and it’s not necessary to provide any for them. However, if you do decide to do some preparation for your hedgehog, you could use dust-free hay, leaves and dry moss to line the house.

Only half fill the house with these materials, leaving some near to the entrance as well. This will allow hedgehogs to ‘find’ and bring in their own bedding, which is part of their nesting process.

One thing that’s definitely worth doing, is clearing the garden of anything unsuitable that a hedgehog might try to use for bedding, such as plastic bags. They’re very resourceful animals, so it’s best not to leave anything lying around that might cause them harm.

Don’t put food, water or any type of chemical, including flea powder, in the house. Food and water may attract pests, whilst flea powder can be fatal to hedgehogs.

Hedgehog House FAQs

No, don’t put food inside a hedgehog house. Nests can be invaded by other hedgehogs and predators looking for food. Plus, old rotten food will attract flies.

If you want to put food out for hedgehogs, create a feeding station for them that’s separate from their nest.

You can check inside a hedgehog house to see if a hedgehog has moved in, but don’t look too often. Checking too frequently may put perspective hedgehogs off. If/when you do have a resident, leave them alone and don’t look inside the house. They will move out if you disturb them, and a mother hedgehog will kill her babies if you touch them or she feels invaded.

If you want to see hedgehogs, keep an eye on the garden at dusk and dawn. Alternatively, an inexpensive night-time camera will help you to see hedgehogs in the garden.

Putting a hedgehog house in your accessible garden, near a clean regular water source, will make the world of difference to our struggling hedgehog population. They are endearing, and surprisingly useful for gardeners as they will eat slugs and snails.

Hedgehogs need all the help they can get, and your garden is one of the best places to place a hedgehog house to keep the dwindling population alive for future generations.

Sources
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