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5 Best Home Weather Stations For Temperature & Humidity Alerts (2021 Review)

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In this guide we’ll look at the best weather stations for the UK market.
I’ve compared accuracy, features, design and cost
to give you my top recommendations.

What is the Best Weather Station?

In a rush? Here's my top choice...

AcuRite Iris Weather Station

Collects fascinating, informative, easy-to-read data.

This AcuRite Pro Color Weather Station will measure temperature, humidity, wind speed, wind direction and rainfall. It's easy to set up, and the sensor stays outdoors, using Wi-Fi to transmit data to an indoor display. The display screen is clear, easy to read, and can be powered by batteries or mains power.

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Everything I Recommend

IMAGE RECOMMENDED PRODUCTSPRODUCT FEATURES
  • 5-in-1 weather sensor
  • Complete rainfall tracking
  • Very precise readings
  • Radio-controlled clock
  • Full range of weather data
  • Clear, easy to read display
  • All-in-one outdoor sensor
  • Complete range of measurements
  • Clear LCD visual display
  • State-of-the-art technology
  • Built-in thermo-hygrometer
  • Colour display
  • Real-time internet publishing
  • Incredibly fast updates
  • Full-colour console

More Detailed Weather Station Reviews

AcuRite Iris Weather Station

FEATURES RATING PRICE
FEATURES
  • 5-in-1 weather sensor
  • Complete rainfall tracking
  • Very precise readings
OUR RATING
100
PRICE
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AcuRite Iris Weather Station Review

If you’ve recently taken an interest in meteorology, or are looking to replace an old machine, this AcuRite Iris Weather Station is one of the best weather stations currently on the market for amateur meteorologists.

The station itself is powered using solar power. Data is then transmitted, via a Wi-Fi connection, to a display unit indoors.

It will measure:

  • Temperature
  • Humidity
  • Wind speed
  • Wind direction
  • Rainfall

This station also allows you to track rainfall over time as well, and displays the current moon phase.

It comes with fixtures so you can attach the sensor to a pole, or alternatively it can be simply placed on a flat, elevated surface outside. Therefore, most garden layouts will be able to find a way to accommodate the weather station – it just needs to be close enough to connect to the Wi-Fi.

Unlike a lot of cheaper weather stations, this unit has a full colour display and the information is easy to read even from across the other side of the room. The screen brightness can be dimmed or turned up depending on the time of day; however, even the lowest brightness is quite strong, and may be disturbing in bedrooms.

Whilst not so much of a frequent problem in the UK, it can also continue to monitor the weather even if there is a power cut thanks to the possibility of running the display off either battery or mains power. Perhaps more helpfully, this also gives flexibility on where the display can be placed in the house, as it doesn’t matter if there is a power outlet available.

In terms of price, this isn’t a budget option, and is one of the more expensive units on this list. However, there is an option to buy two displays which can be placed in different rooms. This sets it apart from others, and means you could even keep one monitor on you, if you wanted to.

Pros

  • Stores history of weather data so it's possible to scroll back through
  • Colour screen is bright and clear to read from across the room
  • Long transmission range between remote unit to base - good for larger properties
  • Weather readings are accurate as long as station is secured well
  • Solar panel powers station even on cloudy days (and there is an option to use a battery if necessary)

Cons

  • Rain gauge may lose some accuracy in strong wind
  • If placed in direct sunlight, the temperature reading can be inaccurate and to high
  • Even lowest level brightness can be quite bright and it may be too much to have the display monitor in a bedroom

Youshiko Weather Station

FEATURES RATING PRICE
FEATURES
  • Radio-controlled clock
  • Full range of weather data
  • Clear, easy to read display
OUR RATING
96
PRICE
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Youshiko Weather Station Review

The Youshiko Weather Station provides a full range of readings. It can also be set up to provide audible warnings for more severe weather.

It’s capable of measuring:

  • Wind speed
  • Wind direction
  • Rainfall
  • Temperature
  • Humidity
  • Heat index
  • Dew point
  • Wind chill
  • Beaufort scale
  • Barometric pressure

It also gives a general forecast indication, highlighting if there will be predominantly sun, partial cloud, cloud, rain, storms or snowfall.

Plus, unlike some other weather stations, the LCD display shows the indoor temperature and humidity (alongside the information it’s receiving from the weather station outside) which can be useful for looking after houseplants and for health reasons.

If you’re particularly interested in keeping an eye on a certain aspect of the weather, you can also set a pre-alert to warn of certain changes like high wind, high rainfall, low pressure, and ice.

Information is transferred from the station to the display via Wi-Fi, and there’s an accurate radio-controlled clock to keep time. It sets itself automatically, meaning that the hourly weather history from the past 24 hours can be checked and is accurately time stamped.

It’s not overly difficult to set up, and the indoor display unit simply requires 3 x AA batteries to get going; however, mounting the weather station can prove more challenging.

During installation, it needs to be pointed north. This can sometimes take a few attempts to get right, and if mounting the station on a pole, the process can involve adjusting a lot of small screws. This does mean there’s a risk of losing small parts whilst fitting the station high up.

Overall, taking the price into consideration, as well as the different features on offer, this comes out as one of the best weather stations in terms of value; it has a lot of the same features as more expensive machines, but is much less expensive. This can possibly be attributed to less high-end technology, such as the more basic black and white display unit.

Pros

  • Can be very accurate, provided it’s mounted in the correct location
  • Outdoor temperature sensor is shaded so gives an accurate reading even in direct sunlight
  • Provides readings of indoor temperature and humidity as well as outdoor data
  • Good signal strength and range between weather station and display
  • Units can be displayed in either metric or imperial measurements

Cons

  • Accessing the minimum and maximum data requires flicking through the whole list of parameters which is time consuming
  • Installing the weather station so that it faces north can be tricky
  • Some of the text is small and hard to read from across the room
  • History of weather data is only stored for 24 hours (except for rainfall)

Bresser 5-in-1 Weather Station

FEATURES RATING PRICE
FEATURES
  • All-in-one outdoor sensor
  • Complete range of measurements
  • Clear LCD visual display
OUR RATING
94
PRICE
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Bresser 5-in-1 Weather Station Review

This Bresser 5-in-1 Weather Station measures 10 different values, including indoor and outdoor temperatures. It shares a lot of similarities with the Youshiko Weather Station, also featured on this list, but analyses wind chill instead of indoor dewpoint.

In particular, it’s one of the best weather stations for analysing rainfall; it keeps a record of hourly, daily, weekly, monthly and total rainfall, so you can continually keep an eye on the data. Other weather information is stored for 24 hours, and is used to create a trend forecast for the next 12 hours.

It’s relatively straight forward to set up the station outside, although it does need to be faced north. This may require the installation of a specific pole in the garden to mount it from, as opposed to using any existing fence posts. It uses 3 x AA batteries, and the display unit needs 3 x AA batteries as well.

The LCD screen is backlit with a warm orange light, which makes it suitable for use in any room. It’s relatively clear, although some of the writing is a little small (particularly the information about rainfall history), so some of the data can’t be read from a distance.

Being from a German-based manufacturer, the clock automatically sets itself to European time. This can be avoided by setting the clock manually, as it’s not connected to the UK radio network. Whilst this is a small inconvenience, which has been corrected in some other models, it’s still not overly difficult or time consuming to set the clock.

Overall, this is an accurate and inexpensive weather station, although its accuracy will rely on finding a suitable place for it in the garden. Its weakness might be in the wind readings, as it may measure gusts as opposed to the average prolonged wind speed.

Pros

  • 150 metre transmission range between sensor and base unit
  • Set up can be completed in as little as 30 minutes
  • Most measurements are very accurate - including temperature, pressure and humidity
  • Results are considered accurate by the majority of customers

Cons

  • Some of the display text is very small and may be difficult to read for some people
  • Although easy to set up, the included manual leaves some aspects to be worked out
  • Backlight only illuminates for approx. 5 seconds at a time which isn't always enough time to read all relevant information
  • Wind monitor may not accurately measure prolonged wind speed, as gusts can skew the data
  • Clock needs to be set manually to avoid it automatically displaying European time

Froggit WH3000 Weather Station

FEATURES RATING PRICE
FEATURES
  • State-of-the-art technology
  • Built-in thermo-hygrometer
  • Colour display
OUR RATING
92
PRICE
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Froggit WH3000 Weather Station Review

If you’re keen to share your weather findings with the worldwide web, as well as collect extensive data over a long period, the Froggit WH3000 Weather Station offers more professional functions than cheaper weather stations.

It’s capable of uploading data to the ‘Weather Underground’ server over W-Fi, meaning you can also access your weather data from an app even if you’re not at home. This data is visible for other users of the Weather Underground website to see, helping to create an accurate map of weather data across the world.

As well as uploading information to the internet, the outside weather station transmits the following data to the indoor display unit:

  • Temperature
  • Humidity
  • Solar radiation
  • UV value
  • Precipitation
  • Wind speed
  • Wind direction

It will also analyse the data to provide an up-to-date forecast, and display indoor temperature, humidity and air pressure as well.

All of this information is easy to read on the clear colour display, and there are two brightness settings to choose between. It’s not overly bright when turned low, but can also double as a nightlight if switched onto the brighter setting at night time.

Depending on where you wish to place the display, it can be powered via batteries (3 X AAA – not included) or mains power. The outside weather station requires 2 X AA batteries.

There are several positives to the Froggit WH3000, including a strong signal between the indoor and outdoor units, the intuitive nature of the display, and the accuracy of the temperature reading even in the sun.

However, there are a couple of features that could be improved upon. For example, the wind arrow indicates where the wind is coming from, as opposed to where it’s going, which isn’t very instinctive. Plus, the manual also isn’t very detailed, and doesn’t cover all of the operations, so you’re left to work some things out.

Pros

  • Temperature gauge is adequately protected from the sun resulting in accurate readings
  • The display console is intuitive and easy to use
  • Rainfall reading is accurate
  • Signal strength between display unit and weather station remains strong even with walls in the way
  • Data can be viewed on the Weather Underground website no matter where you are

Cons

  • User manual not overly clear and some operations are not covered
  • Wind arrow shows direction wind is coming from, not going to - different to the MET Office and other forecasters
  • Connecting to a phone app may take time and patience
  • UV reading can be inaccurate if there is moisture on the unit, magnifying the sun's rays

Aercus Instruments Weather Station

FEATURES RATING PRICE
FEATURES
  • Real-time internet publishing
  • Incredibly fast updates
  • Full-colour console
OUR RATING
90
PRICE
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Aercus Instruments Weather Station Review

For budding meteorologists after new ways to analyse weather data, this Aercus Instruments Weather Station makes it possible to download information onto an SD card and view it on the computer.

As well as connecting automatically to the online Weather Underground server via Wi-Fi, data can also be stored on an SD card directly from the display unit. Spreadsheet software, such as Excel, makes it possible to view this information on the computer.

As a result, this is one of the best weather stations for analysing large amounts of data, as the external memory allows it to store more than 24-hours’ worth of information. The data can be used to create history reports and graphs amongst other things.

The indoor display unit shows immediate updates on the conditions outside and creates short-range forecast predictions. There’s also a separate wall unit for reading the indoor temperature, humidity and pressure.

You can measure:

  • Indoor/outdoor temperature
  • Indoor/outdoor humidity
  • Barometric pressure
  • Wind speed and direction
  • Rainfall
  • UV & light
  • Dew point
  • Wind chill

Overall, this is an accurate and simple device; it does what it’s supposed to with no major problems. It is generally reported to take precise readings, and the display is bright and clear.

It’s even possible to programme a timer for the display, to choose the hours in the day when you would like the backlight to be on.

Set up is relatively straight forward, although the instructions can be a little lacking which may make the process take a little longer. Using the mounting bracket is a little fiddly as well, so the process can be made easier by having four hands on deck as opposed to just two.

Pros

  • Signal is strong even through walls and should not prove a problem for connectivity
  • Colour console has a backlight that can be dimmed or turned off at night
  • Data can be stored on an SD card and used to make graphs or history reports
  • Station can be powered by either solar panels or back-up batteries, the batteries therefore often last for at least a year

Cons

  • Mounting the sensor using supplied clamps can be fiddly
  • Wire from console to plug is short and may require an extension depending on where it is placed

Things to Know Before Buying a Weather Station

Home weather stations are great bits of technology. They allow you to collect environmental data as well as forecast the weather in your area – accurate to the minute!

Not only are they fascinating, they’re also extremely practical too. Weather stations are useful for gardeners planning their planting schedule, general outdoor enthusiasts, or anyone needing to be aware of extreme weather events.

They can collect huge amounts of data including wind speed, air pressure, rainfall, humidity and more.

If this sounds right up your street, or you have a budding amateur meteorologist in your family, a weather station will likely be a fascinating addition to your home.

Finding the best weather station can require a lot of research; there are a lot of different models to consider. The following information should give you more of an idea what to look out for, and perhaps what to avoid as well:

A basic weather station will report on temperature, humidity, and pressure. These are the three most generally useful readings. If this is all you’re after, it’s best not to go for the very cheapest option that claims to take these readings. In general, paying slightly more will get you a machine that will take these readings accurately. A lot of budget weather stations can be way off.

A mid-range weather station will measure the basics (featured above) as well as record more specific data about wind speed, wind direction and rainfall. If you are particularly interested in keeping an eye on the wind or rain, perhaps for specific outdoor activities, consider spending a bit more to get a higher quality mid-range option. Reading reviews can be especially useful for finding out what the weather station does well, and what it doesn’t.

An upper-end weather station will have additional capabilities such as the ability to measure UV and soil moisture, and upload data to the internet. Readings about UV and soil moisture are useful if you’re trying to keep a closer eye on the growing conditions in your garden for specific plants.

Wi-Fi Connectivity

The most standard way for weather stations to work is via your Wi-Fi. Using the network, the sensors outside are able to connect to the display unit inside. This is the same across the board, whether you go for a basic or upper-end model, but bear in mind that cheaper models may have more difficulty picking up your Wi-Fi signal from further away.

Uploading to the Internet

Many mid-range models, and the majority of upper-end models, automatically upload their data to the internet. A lot of weather stations will upload to the Weather Underground database website. Data from weather stations that automatically upload to the internet can often be viewed from an app, or directly from the website, on a computer or smartphone.

This means that you can check on the data from your weather station even when you aren’t at home.

Plus, Weather Underground provides data for meteorologists worldwide. By sharing your weather data, you may be able to offer valuable information to meteorologists about your area – especially as the next reliable weather station might be several miles away.

SD Card Ports

Mid-range and upper-end models can offer the opportunity to save data onto an SD memory card. This is particularly useful if you have a strong interest in the weather and want to monitor it by plotting graphs on the computer. SD cards are usually inserted into the display unit of the weather station, and can then be removed and put directly into the computer.

Smart Home Connectivity

This is the most recent innovation when it comes to weather stations; some of them can connect with your ‘Smart Home’ technology.

If you’re looking for a unit that can talk to your heating, and prompt it to turn on when the temperature drops, there are models that can do that. Equally, some weather stations connect with Amazon’s Alexa, allowing you to simply ask your friendly household robot to tell you about the weather outside.

As you can imagine, this smart home compatibility is currently reserved for upper-end weather stations, but as technology develops, these features will likely filter down into cheaper models as well.

The part of the weather station that gets placed outside is wireless. This is great news because it means it can be placed wherever is most appropriate in your garden (we’ll get round to that in the next section). However, wireless units require the power to either come from batteries or solar panels.

Ideally, you want to look for a weather station which has the option to run off both batteries and solar power. These are the best weather stations to go for because they’ll be able to run off solar power the majority of the time, switching to using battery power only when there isn’t enough sun.

As you can imagine, having a unit that runs off solar power alone may not be entirely practical in the UK; the weather is unlikely to be sufficiently bright all the time. For this reason, a weather station that runs off a combination of batteries and solar power is best.

If there’s no solar panel, it will run well off batteries alone, but you will need to change the batteries more frequently. You should also use high-quality batteries, as weather stations use a lot of power.

Indoor display units tend to run off either batteries of mains power, or have the capacity for both.

Where you want to place this unit will influence which option you should go for. If mains sockets are a valuable commodity in your house, you may prefer a battery-powered option.

Equally, if you don’t want to be messing around with changing batteries when they run out – go with mains power.

It’s important to choose a spot that will be able to accurately record the environmental conditions.

The outside sensor, particular that reading temperature and humidity, should not be placed near the house. Any heat escaping from the house through windows, pipes, etc. will alter the weather station’s readings.

The best place to position the temperature and humidity sensors is over grass, in a shaded area, approximately 1.5 m off the ground.

For a rainfall sensor, height is less important but you should avoid placing it too near the ground. If rain splashes up from the ground onto the sensor, you will get an inaccurate reading. Most importantly, the sensor should be placed somewhere clear of obstacles. Any buildings or trees could interfere with the amount of rain that reaches the sensor.

When it comes to the wind gauge, you need to find somewhere high up to position it. Any quick googling will tell you that wind speed is normally measured at a height of 10 m – not necessarily achievable in a standard garden!

However, you can still mount your sensor on a fence post or pole, or perhaps on a chimney or flat roof. If you plan on fixing your sensor to a chimney, situate it on the side of the prevailing wind – in the UK this is the South East

Aim to position the wind gauge at least 3 m higher than the majority of the obstructions in your garden. The more clearance you can get, the better!

Seeing as many home weather stations have all the sensors in one unit, it can be hard to choose the ideal location. However, a 1.5 m fence post or pole located in the most open area of your garden, set in concrete to keep it level, is often the best solution to provide accurate readings across the board.

Some weather stations can be ‘customised’ with add-ons at a later date.

This is worth looking out for if you’re keen to see how you get on with a basic unit first, but might want to branch out into more taking more measurements at a later date.

Not all units can support add-ons, but those that can will often allow you to add wind monitors and rainfall gauges, amongst other things.

If you think you might be interested in expanding on the type of data you collect, but want to start out simple, make sure to buy an initial unit that can be added to.

Weather Station FAQs

For the temperature and humidity sensor: locate your sensor in a shaded environment out of direct sunlight. The north-facing side of a wall is a good option. Beware of the potential heat radiating from an occupied building. If you can’t avoid placing the sensor in direct sunlight, create some improvised shade with a piece of black painted metal to reflect the sun.

For the wind sensor: place it as high as you can in an area of clear air flow. Consider a fence post, pole, chimney or flat roof.

For the rain gauge sensor: your sensor needs to be in a level position, ideally 30 cm above the ground. Most importantly, ensure that the rain gauge is not in the lee of a building or tree as it will not provide accurate data if it is sheltered from rain.

A lot of home weather stations have all the sensors in one unit so it can be difficult to choose an ideal location. Generally speaking, a 1.5 m fence post or pole located in the most open area of your garden, set in concrete to keep it level, will provide the best solution for getting accurate readings across the board.

Home weather stations provide up-to-date readings of the weather – if you check an online forecast the reading may have been taken several hours ago. They’re practical and easy to check, provide accurate and local information, and can provide alerts about severe weather warnings.

Some weather station display units are radio controlled. This means they are able to automatically set the date and time. As a result, they are easy to set up, accurate, and low-maintenance. You won’t need to alter any settings when the clocks change, and you can trust the display unit to set itself correctly again if it loses power.

Sources
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