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The UK's bestBird Box Cameras2022 Review

What To Look For in a Bird Box Camera

For a wide view inside the bird box, make sure the camera has a wise-angle lens of at least 90°. A larger angle, of around 110°, will make sure you don’t miss any action going on in the corners of the box.

Nowadays, the best bird box cameras use HD recording equipment; look for these if you don’t mind spending a little more for a high-quality image. Otherwise, make sure the camera has at least 700 TVL (TV lines); this will be enough to clearly see what’s going on in the bird box.

One of the most important things to consider is which type of connection will be most suitable for your home. The simplest connection is a Power over Ethernet cable – you’ll only need to run one wire for both electricity and internet. You can then view images from the camera using your Wi-Fi network.

If you position the camera close to the house, you could connect it directly to a television. This may not be a convenient choice for everyone, but it gives a good image.

Finally, if your bird box is situated in a place that doesn’t allow for cables, a wireless bird box camera is a good option. A radio receiver will send images directly to the TV. Picture quality may suffer depending on any obstacles in the way, and you’ll still need a power socket.

After researching different options, my top recommendation is the Green Feathers Bird Box Camera Kit. This camera provides 1080p HD images, records with a 92° angle and has a microphone. It includes a Power over Ethernet converter that runs on a 20 m cable, with a 40 m cable available separately. 

See the reviews below for more details about this bird box camera and other great alternatives. 

See the best Bird Box Cameras below

Compare Bird Box Cameras Here

Use the dropdown to sort the table by the feature that's most important to you.

  • Our score
  • Best For
  • HD
  • Type of Connection
  • Viewing Angle
  • Infrared
  • Microphone
  • Waterproof

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Read Our Bird Box Camera Reviews

B01GGB6OE2
5060423072034
Best HD bird box camera
Green Feathers Bird Box Camera Kit
Top Pick

Best HD bird box camera

  • Where to buy
  • Our Scoring
    Image Quality
    Installation Ease
    Ease of Use
    Value for Money
    Overall
    4 4.5
  • HD
    Yes
  • Type of Connection
    Wired Mains
  • Viewing Angle
    92°
  • Infrared
    Yes
  • Microphone
    Yes
  • Waterproof
    Yes
  • Our Review

    If you already have a bird box in your garden that the birds are comfortable using, this Green Feathers Bird Box Camera Kit is a good option to go for. It can be installed in any standard-size nest box, so you don’t have to start using a new box just to get a camera.

    Plus, if you want to buy a species-specific box, having a camera kit enables you to buy whichever style you’re interested in, and set up this camera inside, without trying to find that specific camera/box combo already in existence.

    The wide-angle lens gives a good view of what’s going on inside the bird box, and the microphone also pick up on any little noises which can be quite interesting.

    Once set up, it’s easy to use, and there is an option to view the footage of the camera on either a smart phone or tablet. You can’t do this when you’re away from the house, as you need to be using the same Wi-Fi network as the camera, but it’s a good wireless option to make use of in the house.

    It records in colour during the day, and makes use of Infrared night cameras when it’s dark.

    The main difficulty can come from setting up the camera, as a lead needs to connect the camera itself to your wireless router. A 20 m cable is provided, which might be long enough for some households, but if not you’ll have to buy a separate extension.

    There’s no separate power cable, at least, so nothing needs to be plugged into a standard mains socket, but you will need to have a Power over Ethernet switch in the house.

    As long as you’ve got one of these, this is one of the best bird box cameras to consider. Especially as you won’t be restricted to viewing the images on the TV, you’ll be able to view them on laptops, computers and smartphones from within the house.

    Pros

    • The included Power over Ethernet converter means you only need to run a single cable to the camera
    • Offers a quality picture day and night
    • The waterproof enclosure surrounding the network cable is reliable and good quality
    • The integrated mini microphone outside of the housing allows you to hear the birds as well as see them

    Cons

    • Not suitable for very small bird boxes
    • It’s slightly difficult to get the mounting bracket into a stable position
    • Does not run off a wireless connection - needs to be plugged into the router
    • Set up may be tricky for those who haven’t set up a camera before
    • The 20 m cable may be too short for some gardens, but 40 m cables are available separately

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B01N0DS2SH
5060423072782
Best with night vision
Green Feathers Wireless Bird Box Camera with Night Vision
  • Where to buy
  • Our Scoring
    Image Quality
    Installation Ease
    Ease of Use
    Value for Money
    Overall
    4 4.5
  • HD
    No
  • Type of Connection
    Wireless Analogue
  • Viewing Angle
    110°
  • Infrared
    Yes
  • Microphone
    Yes
  • Waterproof
    Not listed
  • Our Review

    If ease of installation is something that concerns you, the Green Feathers Wireless Bird Box Camera with Night Vision only needs to be plugged in to a standard mains socket. There’s no messing around with connecting any Power over Ethernet cables or plugging it into the WiFi router.

    This makes this bird box camera particularly suitable for those who don’t have a Power over Ethernet socket, but it also generally makes setting up the camera very straight forward.

    A 20 m cable comes with the mains supply, which will likely be long enough to connect to a mains socket in your house, garage, or shed, depending on where you position your bird box.

    The camera itself can be put into any standard box, and captures images at 700 ‘TV Lines’ of resolution – this gives crisp, detailed images which can be received on your television. If you’re interested in recording images at night too, the invisible infrared LEDs allow for clear night vision without disturbing the birds.

    It also has a wide-angle lens of 110° – the largest angle of any camera on this page.

    One particularly useful thing about this camera is how the focus can be adjusted; you can change it to produce a clear image in your specific set up, so you don’t have to rely on the factory settings.

    But there is one downside to this bird box camera too, and the layout of your home will likely depend on how effectively it works for you: it comes with a wireless receiver which needs to be plugged into a television to see the images. Naturally, this isn’t a problem in itself, but the receiver needs to be positioned pretty close to the bird box to get signal – ideally within around 10 m.

    The further you move the receiver away from the camera, the worse the picture gets.

    Overall, I’d say this is one of the best bird box cameras for those who don’t want to mess with cables, even though the television still needs to be positioned within range of the bird box. For some, achieving the right set up might not be a problem, but for others, having a cable rather than this kind of wireless device might be more suitable.

    Pros

    • The wireless system means there’s no need to run a cable from the television to the garden, the camera simply needs to be connected to the mains
    • The invisible infrared lights won’t distract the birds at night
    • Small microphone lets you hear the birds

    Cons

    • Although wireless, the wireless receiver has to be directly in line with the camera
    • The picture quality deteriorates the further the camera is moved away from the receiver
    • The 20 m extension cable may not be long enough for some users

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B01NAUI1J2
5060423072683
Best for smaller bird boxes
SpyCameraCCTV Wired Bird Box Camera with Night Vision
  • Where to buy
  • Our Scoring
    Image Quality
    Installation Ease
    Ease of Use
    Value for Money
    Overall
    4 4.55
  • HD
    No
  • Type of Connection
    Wired Analogue
  • Viewing Angle
    108°
  • Infrared
    Yes
  • Microphone
    No
  • Waterproof
    No
  • Our Review

    Inexpensive wildlife cameras can struggle to deliver clear pictures – it’s more common that you might think to be left trying to work out if you’re looking at a head, tail, or egg on the screen…

    Fortunately, the SpyCameraCCTV Wired Bird Box Camera offers a much clearer image than a lot of cameras in this price range, filming with 700 ‘TV line’ resolution, which means you’re not left working out ‘which blob is what’ on the display.

    As long as your bird box has sufficient light during the day, it will produce quality images. Then, when it gets dark, the bird box camera changes over to infrared LEDs for night-time filming. As well as video, the in-built microphone also provides sound, so you can listen to the birds – including any recent hatchlings – from your living room TV.

    It also has a wide-angle lens of 108°, allowing a good view into the bird box.

    This isn’t a wireless bird box camera, so it needs to be connected, by a cable, to both the television and a power supply. However, you only have to contend with one wire coming out the back of the camera, as it then divides only once inside the house. The 20 m cable is a standard length, but it’s not the longest available, so you might have to think about the position of your television and bird box in relation to each-other.

    If you’re working on a budget, this is one of the best bird box cameras to consider. It’s inexpensive yet functional, giving a good view into your bird box without having to fork out on pricier equipment.

    Pros

    • The very compact design makes it suitable for smaller bird boxes
    • Both the picture and sound quality are very good
    • Installation and set up is straight forward

    Cons

    • This set only comes with the camera so additional purchases are needed
    • The LEDs bring a pink tinge to the picture which is very noticeable in night time mode
    • A long cable will need to be purchased separately

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How to Choose The Best Bird Box Camera

A bird box camera offers the perfect way to become a wildlife expert in your very own garden. They’re also sure to captivate the interest of old and young family members alike as you monitor the activity of your garden visitors.

These cameras attach to the lid or roof of your bird box, offering fantastic insight into the life of your nesting birds.

There’s a huge range of bird box cameras on the market, of varying quality and design.

If you’re looking for the best bird box camera for your garden, you might not know how to start your search. The following tips will help you to make an informed decision:

The Different Style Options

The first decision you’ll have to make is whether to opt for just a camera kit, or a bird box + camera combo.

Bird Box + Camera Combo

These are easy to set up and ideal if you don’t already have birds nesting in your garden.

The biggest advantage of buying both the bird box and camera as a combo is that the box will be specifically designed to work with the camera. These boxes usually have certain features that work to improve the set up and video quality of the camera. For example:

  • A separate compartment to fit the camera into – you’ll be able to take the camera out without disturbing the birds.
  • A quick-release camera – the camera will be easy to remove from its secured position, again limiting disruption to the nesting birds.
  • A window – this will provide light and improve the quality of the daytime footage.

The main disadvantage of these box/camera combos is that you don’t  always have as much choice when choosing a box as you otherwise would. Your choice has to be based on what boxes are available with the cameras.

Bird Box Camera Kit

A  bird box kit, consisting of just a bird box camera and its cables/fittings (with no bird box included) may be a better choice if you already have birds nesting in your garden.

You can use a bird box kit to install cameras in bird boxes that you already own, which is great if you know that birds are already comfortable with them.

Of course, a camera kit is also a good option if you’ve recently bought a bird box and don’t want to buy another one, or if you’re looking to buy a specific type of bird box and the design isn’t available as a combo with a camera.

They can be a bit more fiddly to set up, which is to be expected, especially as the bird box you’ll be fitting it into wasn’t necessarily designed for use with a camera.

You might need to be a little bit more adept at DIY to install a camera like this, especially compared to the bird box + camera combos. But, they’re still relatively straight forward so don’t be too put off.

Choosing a Wireless or ‘Cabled’ System

Bird box cameras are either wireless or need to be connected to the television using cables.

Wireless bird box cameras generally still need to be plugged in for power, they just don’t require wires to transmit the camera images to a display inside. ‘Cabled’ systems need to be plugged in for power, as well as connected into the TV.

A quick note on power source: standard bird-box cameras are mains powered, but there are also solar-powered and battery-powered cameras available, as well as units powered by Power-over-Ethernet ports.

‘Cabled’ Systems

Cabled bird box cameras tend to offer better image quality because there is a direct connection to the camera. However, it does mean that you will need to find a way to run the cables from the garden into your house.

This may require drilling a hole for the cable, or running it through an open window when you want to watch the camera.

With most cabled bird box cameras there’s generally only one cable to contend with, which splits into three cables at the end of its length. These connect to the ‘video’ and ‘audio’ jacks on your TV, as well as to a power socket.

Cables tend to be either 20 m or 30 m in length, so getting one of these models might depend on the location of your camera in relation to your television – if a cable won’t reach, you might need a wireless model.

Wireless Systems

Wireless bird box cameras don’t require a cable to connect them to your television, tablet or computer.

That said, they still require access to a power supply.

Different cameras connect to different power sources, so you may still need to run a power cable from the camera to a mains socket or Power over Ethernet connection.

Other options, like solar-powered or battery-powered cameras are wireless in every sense of the word.

There are two main types of wireless camera:

  1. Some cameras transmit video to a wireless signal convertor. These will come with an additional receiver unit which gets connected to the TV. You’ll then be able to watch the live-stream from your television. The benefit of this is that you don’t need to run a cable to your television. The drawback to these receivers is that they often get quite weak reception, so your bird-box camera and television should ideally be within 20 m of each other.
  2. Other cameras transfer video via your wireless internet by using a Power over Ethernet connection. They can then stream the video to devices connected to your Wi-Fi network, such as laptops, tablets and phones. The benefit of this connection is that you can get a strong reception as long as your internet is good. Plus, you’ll be able to view the video on different devices. The drawback is you will need a Power over Ethernet connection in your house, within a cable’s reach of the bird box.

If you have a larger garden, or an ‘inconveniently’ placed bird box, you’ll probably find that the best bird box camera will be a wireless model. At least then there’s only the power supply to worry about – sometimes there’s a limit to how much wire you can trail to your TV, no matter how determined you are.

Image Quality and Viewing Width

Look for a high resolution bird box camera to make sure you’re getting the sort of picture quality that you’re hoping for. Some bird box cameras are HD, which is definitely a buzzword to look out for.

It’s quite common to find bird box cameras that offer ‘700 TVL’ resolution, which is also quite high quality, yet not as expensive as HD. Anything under 700 TVL may not give you the clear image you’re hoping for.

When it comes to viewing width, ideally you want it to be as large an angle possible. Something around 100° will make sure you really get a good view inside the nest. The bigger the angle, the more you’ll be able to see of the bird box’s interior.

When it comes to improving the viewing experience further, a built-in microphone can add another level of interest. As you might expect, it will allow you to hear, as well as see, what’s going on, which can be really fascinating.

Night Vision in Bird Box Cameras

Many bird box cameras come with infrared LEDs that allow you to monitor what’s going on, even at night.

The discreet infrared LEDs won’t disturb the birds while they nest, so you don’t need to worry about these cameras causing them any problems – birds aren’t able to see infrared light.

If you’re hoping to frequently watch the birds at night, the importance of a decent-quality bird box camera (HD or 700 TVL, as mentioned above) becomes even more significant. Distinguishing between shapes when using night vision can be a lot harder when the picture quality isn’t good to begin with.

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Bird Box Camera FAQs

How do bird box cameras work?

Bird box cameras are often no bigger than a matchbox. They come with a bracket that screws inside the top of the bird box that the camera attaches to.

They don’t always record video, but live stream it to either your television, computer, or tablet.

The style that you buy will dictate how you can view the live stream. Some cameras connect via cable or wireless receiver to the television. Others plug into a Power over Ethernet cable which allows you to view live streams on any device connected to the same WiFi network.

How can I encourage birds to nest in my garden?

Use bird feeders

Attract birds to your garden by placing bird feeders near your bird box. Feed will encourage birds to explore your garden, and you can choose the feed based on the type of bird you are hoping to attract!

When the birds have discovered your bird box, move the feeders away so that you don’t disturb the nesting process.

Put out a variety of food

Just like humans, different birds have different tastes! Blue tits enjoy peanuts and sunflower seeds, while robins and thrushes like mealworms. Put out a variety of feed and you’re more likely to attract a range of birds.

Use the right type of bird box

Different birds prefer different types of bird boxes. Tits like bird boxes with small entryways, while robins like more space. So if you want to attract a variety of birds, invest in a few different types of bird box!

Remember to clean out and repair your bird boxes in the winter, ready for the birds to arrive back in the spring.

Put your bird box in the right place

Ensure your bird box is in the right location in your garden. Most birds prefer to nest relatively close to the ground in bushes, so don’t place the bird box too high up. You’ve got to make sure however, that the bird box is still be out of reach of predators.

Getting birds to nest in your garden is a matter of covering all of their needs – that includes a good supply of food and water, shelter, security, and some cosy nesting spots. If you can provide these things, birds will be much more likely to set up home in your garden.

I have a very small bird box. Can I install a bird box camera in it? And how?

Bird box cameras are very small, often no bigger than a matchbox, so it’s very probable that one will fit in a small bird box.

If you’re worried, check the product specification for more details on its size, and contact the manufacturer to ask if necessary.

The cameras come with a bracket which you screw to the roof of the bird box, or high up on the inside wall, where it is out of harm’s way. You then simply attach the bird box camera to the bracket and you are ready to go.

How do I set the focus of my camera ready for the birds to start nesting?

When setting up your bird box camera, place an item, such as a stone, that is slightly larger than the bird you are expecting and adjust the camera so that this is in focus.

Alternatively, choose a bird box that provides access to the camera through the roof so that you can adjust the camera focus without disturbing the birds.

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Bird Box Cameras Price Comparison

Every day DIY Garden scans thousands of products to help you find the cheapest prices. Not only do we want to help you find the best products through our in-depth testing, but we also want to help you find the best places to buy them too. We’re working hard to expand our network of retailers, and will be continually adding in new options.

The Cheapest Bird Box Camera Prices Found Today

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