shed-alarm

5 Best Shed Alarms to Protect Your Valuables (2021 Review)

Written by:

DIY Garden is reader-supported. If you click through using links on this page, we may earn an affiliate commission. Learn more.

In this guide we’ll take a look at the best shed alarms for the UK market.
I’ve compared security features, build quality, noise projection and cost
to give you my top recommendations.

What is The Best Shed Alarm?

In a rush? Here's my top choice...

Yale Wireless Shed and Garage Alarm

Simple, effective and powerful!

This Yale SAA5015 Wireless Shed and Garage Alarm is a loud and powerful deterrent. It will alert you to the presence of intruders, whilst scaring them off in the process! It's simple to use and offers reliable results.

CHECK PRICE →

Everything We Recommend

IMAGE RECOMMENDED PRODUCTSPRODUCT FEATURES
  • 12 m alarm range
  • Loud100 dB siren
  • Wall mounted or free standing
  • Alarm is easy to fit and use
  • Very loud 110 dB alarm
  • Award winning
  • Simple to fit & use
  • Loud 105 dB siren
  • Good value for money
  • Simple to install
  • Super loud 130 dB siren
  • High quality
  • Quick to install
  • Very loud 130 dB siren
  • Freestanding or wall mounted

More Detailed Shed Alarm Reviews

Yale Wireless Shed and Garage Alarm

FEATURES RATING PRICE
FEATURES
  • 12 m alarm range
  • Loud100 dB siren
  • Wall mounted or free standing
OUR RATING
100
PRICE
CHECK PRICE →

Yale Wireless Shed and Garage Alarm Review

Whilst you might more commonly associate the Yale company with door locks than alarm systems, their Wireless Shed and Garage Alarm is both loud and simple to use, providing an inexpensive way to protect your outbuildings.

Made of white plastic, and powered by 4 x AA batteries, it can be positioned anywhere in the shed or garage that will allow it to detect movement. It has a range of 12 m, so doesn’t need to be positioned right by the door, and emits a very loud 100 dB siren if it senses any activity.

The alarm doesn’t need to be armed all the time, but can be turned on simply by pressing the number four on the keypad. This makes it easy to turn on at night or whenever required.

You can set the four-digit deactivation code yourself, although there aren’t as many code possibilities as with some other alarms – you need to use each number once and it’s just a case of choosing what order to put the four numbers in.

Upon entering the shed, you have 10 seconds to disarm the unit before the alarm starts to sound. This is generally enough time to enter the code, so you shouldn’t have to worry about getting mistakenly deafened.

For any unwanted intruders, on the others hand, the alarm will be a very startling and loud deterrent.

Like a lot of alarms in this style, its main weakness is the strength of its construction. As a plastic alarm, intruders could deactivate it by smashing up the unit. For this reason, it’s best placed somewhere high up, but this can make it more difficult to enter the code.

Also, it does emit a small ‘pip’ sound when it detects movement, which may alert people to its presence. However, this also acts as a helpful reminder when entering the shed to turn off the alarm.

Overall, this is one of the best shed alarms available; it’s from a reputable company, simple to operate, extremely loud, and easy to install. It’s also inexpensive, which is another benefit.

Pros

  • Simple to set up and programme in around 15 minutes
  • Extremely loud 100 dB alarm will likely startle intruders and should be audible from the house
  • 10 second grace period before alarm sounds is sufficient to enter deactivation code
  • Motion sensor works well with a reliable 12 m detection range
  • Easy to arm by pressing the number four

Cons

  • Pre-beep indicates alarm has been triggered which may give intruders a warning and time to dismantle it
  • Plastic construction could be easily smashed or knocked off the wall
  • Code resets when the batteries are changed

Defender Wireless Shed Alarm

FEATURES RATING PRICE
FEATURES
  • Alarm is easy to fit and use
  • Very loud 110 dB alarm
  • Award winning
OUR RATING
95
PRICE
CHECK PRICE →

Defender Wireless Shed Alarm Review

If you have a particular door or window that you would like to add another level of protection to, this Defender Wireless Shed Alarm emits a siren when the entryway is opened.

Of course, it is not armed all the time, but when activated (by pressing ‘four’ on the keypad) it will produce an alarm of 110 dB to panic any intruders. It also has two modes, so not only is it designed to tell you if the door is opened, but also if anyone is trying to force entry.

The alarm consists of two units, which are placed on the door frame and door, and it senses when the magnetic link between these two parts is broken.

In general, it seems to work best when used on the mode to indicate if a door or window has been opened. The separate ‘forced-entry’ detection mode can be very sensitive, and cause the alarm to sound when it senses the slightest vibration (which can be quite common with the wind and rain beating against the shed door). However, you can choose to deactivate this option.

Disarming the alarm is done by entering a four-digit code into the keypad. You can set and choose this code yourself to make it easier to remember. Once armed, you have 5 seconds to exit the building and, on re-entry, you have 5 seconds to enter the code and disarm the alarm.

It requires 3 x AAA batteries, so there are no wires to plug in, and it’s simple to set up in place. It should only be used on the inside of buildings, not externally, as it doesn’t have any specific weatherproofing.

All in all, this is one of the best shed alarms for protecting a specific door or window. It’s extremely useful for arming specific entry points, and is another simple and inexpensive alarm option.

Pros

  • Loud 110 dB alarm can be heard from within the house
  • Very simple to install, use and secure thanks to the wireless design and clear instructions
  • Useful for arming a particular door or window

Cons

  • Vibration sensor is very sensitive although this function can be turned off
  • When the batteries are changed it will forget your pin - retain the instructions so you know how to reset
  • Relatively short 5 second grace period to disarm the alarm

Tech Traders Wireless Motion Sensor Alarm

FEATURES RATING PRICE
FEATURES
  • Simple to fit & use
  • Loud 105 dB siren
  • Good value for money
OUR RATING
92
PRICE
CHECK PRICE →

Tech Traders Wireless Motion Sensor Alarm Review

If you’re concerned about alarms being too easy for intruders to reach, this Tech Traders Wireless Motion Sensor Alarm can be positioned higher out of the way. This is because there are remote controls provided, so you don’t need to reach the alarm to disarm it.

A wall-mounting bracket is included, and the alarm can be angled to face the entry point from its mounted position, allowing the motion sensor to detect activity. It has a scanning area of 110°, so could potentially detect movement from windows as well, depending on the layout of your shed.

With two keyring remote controls, which are used to arm and disarm the alarm, different members of the family can have access to the shed or garage by keeping a remote on their keys. These remote controls make this one of the best shed alarms in terms of ease of use, because there’s no need to panic about entering a code.

The main unit runs off 4 x AA batteries, which are not included, and the small remotes use cell batteries, which are included.

It sounds at 105 dB, which is reasonably loud, although with the shed doors closed it can be more difficult to hear. However, it’s certainly loud enough to act as a deterrent and should spook any potential intruders.

This isn’t a high-end security product, but it offers good value for its low price. Plus, using a remote instead of a keycode is sure to appeal to some people, as it makes the act of disarming the alarm less stressful.

Pros

  • Comes with wall bracket and can be placed higher than other alarms as there's no keypad to reach
  • Remote control arm/disarm can be easier than remembering a code
  • Two remote controls included means that more than one household member can arm/disarm alarm
  • Remote control works from a reasonably distance of approximately 5 metres

Cons

  • Quickly uses battery power so batteries don't last long
  • May take practise to work out where to aim the infra-red light to disarm the alarm

Defender PIR Alarm with Fob

FEATURES RATING PRICE
FEATURES
  • Simple to install
  • Super loud 130 dB siren
  • High quality
OUR RATING
84
PRICE
CHECK PRICE →

Defender PIR Alarm with Fob Review

As one of the loudest shed alarms featured here, this Defender PIR Alarm with Fob will produce a 130 dB sound if it senses movement, and is disarmed by pressing a button on the remote control.

It’s a relatively small and understated unit, measuring just 15 x 7.5 cm, so can tuck into the corners of a shed or summerhouse without being too obvious.

There is one remote included, which perhaps isn’t as useful as the two that are included with the Tech Traders alarm; however, it does still mean that the alarm can be positioned out of the way and make it harder to tamper with.

The motion sensor itself is effective without going overboard – it doesn’t seem to be set off by inconsequential things like spiders or anything outside the shed, but will sound if there’s movement inside.

It emits a warning beep first, if motion is detected, and the has a short delay before the siren goes off. Some customers have suggested that this delay is a little long, as it might give intruders time to locate the alarm, although all of these security products have a certain amount of grace period to allow time to disarm the alarm.

The alarm runs off 2 x AAA batteries which come included

Overall, it’s one of the best shed alarms if you want something discreet, because it’s a small unit that can be placed out of the way and armed/disarmed by remote control. The fact that only one remote is included might be an inconvenience for some, especially if more than one person often needs to alarm and disarm the unit.

Pros

  • Simple to set up and operate - simply push a button on the fob to arm
  • Easy to mount to the wall in awkward areas due to the compact design
  • All batteries come included for immediate installation
  • Smallest motion-sensor unit

Cons

  • Battery life is relatively poor
  • Should not be exposed to extreme temperatures and very hot or very cold weather may cause damage

Minder MA30 Mini PIR Alarm

FEATURES RATING PRICE
FEATURES
  • Quick to install
  • Very loud 130 dB siren
  • Freestanding or wall mounted
OUR RATING
80
PRICE
CHECK PRICE →

Minder MA30 Mini PIR Alarm Review

If you’ve been put off by other alarms that provide a warning ‘pip’ before they start sounding, this Minder MA30 Mini PIR Alarm doesn’t give intruders the same luxury. It launches into a loud 130 dB siren without any heads up, increasing the element of surprise.

Of course, this does mean that when you enter the shed you won’t be reminded that the alarm is armed either, so you need to remember to turn it off. However, at least this can be done easily with the included remote control.

The remote control is attached to a keyring, so can be kept to hand, and there are simple ‘on’/’off’ buttons making it clear to use. However, only one remote is included, meaning it can prove slightly less convenient if several people want access to the shed.

The alarm allows a 30 second exit delay and a 5 second entry delay. The 5 second delay is slightly shorter than some other alarms, but considering that you deactivate it using a remote control, and not a time-consuming PIN, it’s a sufficient amount of time.

Having such a short delay means that the alarm sounds almost as soon as it detects movement, without allowing intruders to acclimatise to the shed first either.

It comes with a wall mount and is easy to install, requiring 4 x AA batteries that don’t come included.

Due to its quick response time, it’s one of the best shed alarms if you’re hoping to catch intruders out with the element of surprise. Some other alarms can feel like they leave a bit too long before sounding, potentially giving intruders time to locate the unit and deactivate it, but this one responds almost instantly.

Pros

  • No warning 'pip' sound to alert intruders to its presence
  • Short delay between entering and alarm sounding allows for element of surprise
  • Included instructions are very simple to follow which makes for easy set up
  • Beeps to alert when it has been armed and disarmed

Cons

  • Only one remote included
  • Remote may sometimes only work from a relatively short distance of approximately 3 m

Things to Know Before Buying a Shed Alarm

Garden buildings, like sheds, can be harder to protect from thieves than the home. Naturally, burglars know that there could be valuable items in the shed, and that no-one will be around to immediately stop them breaking it.

Luckily, it is easy to safeguard your sheds, garages, summer houses and even caravans with a shed alarm.

When armed, these alarms will emit a loud siren if they detect any movement. This is intended to spook intruders, as well as alert anyone in the vicinity to their presence.

There are a few things to consider when looking to buy a shed alarm, including which style to get so that it’s practical to use. Below you will find plenty of information about shed alarms, so that you can make an informed purchase.

Many of us have buildings in the garden that we use for storage, office space, or relaxation. Using the space in our garden is a great way to extend the living space in our homes – as long as we remember to consider security.

These buildings are more vulnerable, considering their position away from the main house.

If you have anything of significant value in your shed or garage, such as expensive tools or bikes, an alarm is vital. However, even if you don’t have anything of value in your shed, it is still worth protecting it with an alarm. Thieves could use the tools from your shed, such as ladders and hammers, to access your home.

You may think that you’ll hear a disturbance if someone tries to break into an outbuilding in the middle of the night, but this isn’t always the case. In fact, even with a loud alarm installed, you might not hear a shed alarm either (it depends on the location of your shed and how soundproof your house is).

However, having a shed alarm is as much about spooking and deterring intruders as it is about alerting you to their presence. Likelihood is that once a burglar has been confronted with a screeching 100 dB alarm in the middle of the night, they’re not going to stick around to see who’s coming to catch them.

Shed alarms tend to be activated and deactivated in one of two ways, depending on their design. Either, an alarm will have a keypad that requires a code, or a paired remote control.

Alarms That Deactivate with a Code

Codes for deactivating motion-sensor alarms don’t have to be very long – a lot of units only have a four-number keypad and require a four-digit code. The good news here is that these short codes aren’t difficult to remember or enter correctly; however, it does mean that there are less possible combinations (which some people may dislike for security reasons).

If you’d prefer a longer code, look for an alarm with a six- or eight-digit keypad.

The main benefit of having an alarm with a code is that several people can have the ability to disarm the alarm. This means that different family members can know how to disarm and re-arm the alarm, without all needing separate keys.

To activate, or ‘arm’, one of these alarms, you often just press a number on the keypad. You then have time to exit before the alarm arms itself. To deactivate one of these alarms, you need to enter the code within a set period of time after entering the shed, or the alarm will start sounding.

Whilst entering the code is not difficult, it can be a little stressful to make sure that it’s keyed in before the alarm starts. Due to needing to put in a keycode, these alarms have to be placed somewhere that’s easy to reach, quickly, within the allotted time.

This generally means that they have to be positioned low enough to be within arm’s reach, and may make them susceptible to vandalism if intruders spot the alarm and believe they can deactivate it.

Alarms that Deactivate with a Remote Control

A lot of alarms come with a remote control that will allow them to be armed and disarmed from a distance. They tend to work using either radio signals, or infrared.

The main benefit of an alarm that deactivates with a remote control is that it can be placed higher up, out of the way. You don’t need to be able to reach the alarm to disarm it, which means it can be better concealed from intruders.

Remote controls also make it possible to disarm the alarm from a distance, often whilst still standing in the doorway of the shed, and may be less stressful than remembering and entering a keycode.

In general, to arm an alarm using a remote control, you simply press an ‘arm’ or ‘on’ button on the remote. To deactivate the unit, you press a ‘disarm’ or ‘off’ button.

There are two potential disadvantages to a using a remote-control alarm over a keycode alarm. You may need to accurately aim the remote control at the alarm, and it can take a while to get the hang of where to point it. Plus, some remote controls can be used at less of a distance than others, so with some models you may have to get closer to the alarm.

The other disadvantage is that only someone with the remote control can deactivate the alarm. Some alarms only come with one remote control, whilst others come with two. If you want several people to have access to the shed, a limited number of remote controls can be inconvenient.

Certain alarm systems will allow you to purchase additional remote controls, whilst others don’t have this option.

Whilst most motion-sensor alarms will act as some form of deterrent, there are a few design features to consider that may offer further security:

  • A short delay time between detecting motion and sounding the alarm. Some motion-sensor alarms will leave as long as 20 – 30 seconds after detecting motion to sound the alarm. This is useful when you’re trying to disarm the alarm after entering the shed yourself, but not necessarily the most effective approach against intruders. A shorter delay may help spook would-be burglars with the element of surprise, giving them less time to acclimatise or expect an alarm before it starts sounding.
  • No audible ‘pip’ after detecting motion. This is another feature that can help improve the ‘surprise’ of an alarm, and deter intruders. Some alarms emit a small beep when they have detected motion. On a normal day, this will help you remember to turn off the alarm; however, it also serves to give intruders warning about the presence of an alarm. This could allow them to sabotage the alarm before it sounds, or grab items and run even before the alarm starts.
  • An alarm that can be placed high up out of harm’s way. If the alarm needs to be deactivated with a keycode, it will need to be placed somewhere that you can reach the keypad. However, if it can be deactivated with a remote control (often working with infrared), then the alarm can be placed higher out of the way. Depending on where you can place your alarm, you might be able to put it somewhere that can’t be easily reached by intruders. This can reduce the likelihood of it being vandalised by them.

Shed Alarm FAQ

Whilst a shed alarm is an excellent deterrent for intruders, there are plenty of other measures you can take to secure your outbuildings. Here are a few:

  • Make sure your shed is secured with a heavy-duty padlock and hasp that are difficult to remove with bolt cutters. Ensure that the hinges on your shed door are well made too, so the door can’t be easily detached.
  • Make sure the fences and gates around your garden are secure. This will help prevent thieves from getting access to your garden in the first place.
  • Motion-triggered security lighting provides another good deterrent to help protect your property. If caught in bright light, intruders will feel much more exposed and less comfortable walking around your property. Wireless security lights are very easy to set up.
  • Some people choose to purchase signs that read ‘this shed is alarmed’ to deter criminals from attempting a break in.

Avoid storing very expensive items in a shed or outbuilding. These should be stored indoors or in a secure garage, preferably with a wired alarm. Always ensure that items stored in sheds and outbuildings are covered by your home contents insurance for added peace of mind. You can also mark items with a special UV pen which will make it easier for the items to be returned to you if they are found by the police.

Yes, a home security system can be extended to cover sheds and outbuildings, but this can be an expensive option.

An outbuilding may need to be in a different ‘zone’ from your home, so that it can be secured even when you are at home during the day. Often a standalone alarm is a simpler more cost-effective option.

Many wireless alarms are fitted to the inside of the shed and there will not be any sign that the shed has an alarm system in place. Therefore, it’s unlikely to act as a motivating factor to thieves.

It’s still a good idea to install an alarm on sheds that don’t contain anything of value, especially if there is anything in the shed that could be used to assist a break in to your home, for example, ladders, hammers and other heavy tools.

Sources
Scroll to Top